Pāḷi Dictionary

Pāḷi Dictionary

Pāḷi Dictionary

Input Word Explanation Preview

What Languages of Dictionaries to Show?
Pāli-English
Pāli-Japanese
Pāli-Chinese
Pāli-Vietnamese
Pāli-Burmese

The Order of Languages of Dictionaries to Show?
No Such Word
Looking Up ...
Loading Words ...
Internet Connection Error

About This Website

This site is online Pāḷi Dictionary (Pāli to Chinese, Pāli to English, Pāli to Japanese, Pāli-Vietnamese, Pāli-Burmese). The source of the dictionaries come from Pali Canon E-Dictionary Version 1.94 (PCED). The source code of this website is at pali repository on GitHub, and the data of this website is at data repository on GitHub. Any suggestion or questions? Welcome to contact me.

Buddhist Dictionary of Pali Proper Names by G P Malalasekera
Kapi Jātaka:1.Kapi Jātaka (No.250).-Once when the Bodhisatta was living the ascetic life in the Himalaya,his wife having died,a monkey came in the rainy weather to the hermitage clad in an anchorite’s robe which he had found in the forest.The Bodhisatta recognised the monkey and drove him away.

The story was told in reference to a hypocritical brother.J.ii.268ff



2.Kapi Jātaka (No.404).-Once the Bodhisatta and Devadatta were both born as monkeys.One day a mischievous monkey took his seat on the arch which was over the gateway to the park and,when the king’s chaplain passed under the arch,he let excrement fall on his head,and,on the chaplain looking up,even into his mouth.The chaplain swore vengeance on the monkeys,and the Bodhisatta,hearing of it,counseled them to seek residence elsewhere.His advice was followed by all except the monkey,who was Devadatta,and a few of his followers.Sometime after,the king’s elephants were burnt through a fire breaking out in their stalls.A goat had eaten some rice put out to dry and was beaten with a torch; his hair caught fire and the fire spread to the stalls.The chaplain,seizing his opportunity,told the elephant-doctors that the best remedy for burns was monkey-fat,and five hundred monkeys in the royal gardens were slain by archers for the sake of their fat.

The story was told in reference to Devadatta being swallowed up by the earth.J.iii.355f; cp.Kāka Jātaka.



3.Kapi Jātaka.-See the Mahā-kapi Jātaka.

Browse Dictionary

Powered by web.py, Jinja2, AngularJS, Bootstrap, Glyphicons Halflings,